Bosniaks and Croats, Divided in Class and at Play

Aug 6th, 2011

Bosniaks and Croats, Divided in Class and at Play

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER VITEZ, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA — Every morning at the local grade school formerly known as Brotherhood and Unity, the Catholic Croat children head to the right, and the Bosnian Muslims head to the left. The Croats study in the school’s cheerful looking main building, which was recently renovated. The Muslims attend class in the crumbling, dingy annex next door. The school ended up behind the Croat line during the 1992-95 war that killed some 100,000 people. It has remained there ever since.

Macedonia Plays Up Past Glory

Jun 23rd, 2011

Macedonia Plays Up Past Glory

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER SKOPJE, Macedonia — In the view of many here, the neighbors have been bullying this little Balkan country for a long time. Bulgarians see its people as Bulgarians with accents. Serbia used to consider the land Southern Serbia and refuses to recognize its church. Greece accuses the country of nothing less than stealing its name, history and national symbols. This week, Macedonia pushed back. In a precisely calibrated display of political and civil engineering, workers lifted a 14.5-meter, or 47-foot, bronze statue of Alexander the Great, weighing 30 tons, and placed it on a 15-meter-high pedestal in the central square of Skopje, the capital.

Nationalism Fading From Serbia’s Political Stage

Jun 2nd, 2011

Nationalism Fading From Serbia’s Political Stage

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER BELGRADE — In a country that nurtures a grudge about an event that occurred more than 600 years ago, once-fiery Serbian nationalism now seems strangely muted. With the 68-year-old General Ratko Mladic settling into his prison cell in The Hague, the relative silence with which Serbs greeted his arrest and extradition speaks volumes about the turnaround taken by the country’s leadership and the fading of nationalism as an issue from the political stage. A Belgrade street protest on May 29 against the arrest of Mr. Mladic drew an estimated 10,000 people, smaller than the crowds that typically gather after important soccer matches. The major political parties accepted the extradition, after 15 years of mounting international pressure, as the price of getting closer to Europe.

A Fugitive in Their Midst? ‘Ridiculous,’ Villagers Say

May 29th, 2011

A Fugitive in Their Midst? ‘Ridiculous,’ Villagers Say

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER LAZAREVO, Serbia — This village near the Romanian border is Everytown, an indistinguishable collection of tidy lawns and trimmed trees, where the local people have been rocked by the news that Ratko Mladic, one of the world’s most wanted war crimes suspects, had been found hiding out among them. They say it couldn’t be true. “There is no chance that he was living here,” said the village mayor, Radmilo Stanisic, reflecting the general sentiment in this tightknit community. “Everyone knows everyone here. We’re like a big family.”

Turkey Plans Internet Filtering

May 22nd, 2011

Turkey Plans Internet Filtering

How would you like the government to filter your internet usage? Family style? Children style? Domestic style? Or would you prefer the standard package? Internet users in Turkey will soon have to make that choice.  Turkey often presents itself as the leading democracy in the middle east but free speech advocates say internet censorship there is among the heaviest in the world. And its about to get worse. As Matthew Brunwasser reports from Istanbul, protestors gathered across Turkey to express their opposition.

The Haunting Persistence of Albanian Blood Feuds

May 21st, 2011

The Haunting Persistence of Albanian Blood Feuds

Albania has had a vibrant if somewhat messy democracy since the fall of communism in the early 1990s. But while Albanian politics have evolved, other aspects of society have remained in the dark ages. In murder cases, victims families sometimes refer to a traditional legal code dating back to the 15th Century. It’s called the Kanun. Meditators are now trying to end this practice and resolve conflicts peacefully. From Fan in Northern Albania, Matthew Brunwasser reports.

South Sudan as NGOistan

May 21st, 2011

South Sudan as NGOistan

International non-governmental organizations often play a key role in developing new nations or rebuilding wartorn ones. NGOs are doing both those things in South Sudan. Africa’s newest country is in the process of emerging from a region that was torn apart by decades of civil war. Right now South Sudan is almost entirely run by NGOs. From the capital Juba, Matthew Brunwasser reports.

American Evangelicals in South Sudan

Mar 22nd, 2011

American Evangelicals in South Sudan

Religious identity has played a large role in the emergence of South Sudan, Africa’s newest nation. Theres a large number of Christians in South Sudan. That sets it apart from North Sudan where Muslims are the majority. American Christians were instrumental in pressuring the Bush administration to support the 2005 peace treaty that ended the long civil war between north and south. That influence is still felt in South Sudan as Matthew Brunwasser reports from Juba.

2 Men Jostle for Power in Albania

Mar 21st, 2011

2 Men Jostle for Power in Albania

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER TIRANA — In Albania’s rough and murky politics, the personalities are strong and the public institutions still count for less, 20 years after communism crumbled. The latest illustration of violent tussle between two opposing camps occurred Friday, when a crowd tried to storm the office of Prime Minister Sali Berisha. The five-hour clash left three protesters dead, about 60 hurt and 113 arrested. Opposition supporters threw sticks and stones at the building, while the police responded with tear gas, water cannons and firearms.

Racism in Sudan

Mar 19th, 2011

Racism in Sudan

Matthew Brunwasser reports on how racism has played a divisive role in relations between Sudan’s ruling northeners and the people of southern Sudan. Ethnically, northern Sudanese are generally classified as Arabs and Southerners as blacks. But many Sudanese are a combination of both Arabs and Africans and the deep rooted racism of the northerners has long been politically destabilizing.