American Evangelicals in South Sudan

Mar 22nd, 2011

American Evangelicals in South Sudan

Religious identity has played a large role in the emergence of South Sudan, Africa’s newest nation. Theres a large number of Christians in South Sudan. That sets it apart from North Sudan where Muslims are the majority. American Christians were instrumental in pressuring the Bush administration to support the 2005 peace treaty that ended the long civil war between north and south. That influence is still felt in South Sudan as Matthew Brunwasser reports from Juba.

2 Men Jostle for Power in Albania

Mar 21st, 2011

2 Men Jostle for Power in Albania

By MATTHEW BRUNWASSER TIRANA — In Albania’s rough and murky politics, the personalities are strong and the public institutions still count for less, 20 years after communism crumbled. The latest illustration of violent tussle between two opposing camps occurred Friday, when a crowd tried to storm the office of Prime Minister Sali Berisha. The five-hour clash left three protesters dead, about 60 hurt and 113 arrested. Opposition supporters threw sticks and stones at the building, while the police responded with tear gas, water cannons and firearms.

Racism in Sudan

Mar 19th, 2011

Racism in Sudan

Matthew Brunwasser reports on how racism has played a divisive role in relations between Sudan’s ruling northeners and the people of southern Sudan. Ethnically, northern Sudanese are generally classified as Arabs and Southerners as blacks. But many Sudanese are a combination of both Arabs and Africans and the deep rooted racism of the northerners has long been politically destabilizing.

Sudan and the West

Mar 18th, 2011

Sudan and the West

Sudan’s support for the the South Sudanese independence referendum has won the country praise from western nations. But the country has long been considered a pariah state. From Khartoum, Matthew Brunwasser reports on relations between Sudan and the West.

South Sudan referendum under way

Jan 7th, 2011

South Sudan referendum under way

The people of South Sudan have been voting for the second day of an independence referendum which is widely expected to result in the birth of the world’s newest state. Turnout wasn’t as heavy as on the first day, but correspondents said voters appeared to be just as determined. Matthew Brunwasser reports from Juba.

Southern Sudan votes

Jan 5th, 2011

Southern Sudan votes

The map of Africa is very likely to change soon. The continent’s largest country looks set to be split in two as people in southern Sudan start voting in a referendum on independence this Sunday. This is not expected to be a close outcome: it would be a surprise if fewer than 90% of the votes were in favor of breaking away from the north. Matthew Brunwasser reports from Juba, South Sudan.

Turkish gays and the military

Jan 4th, 2011

Turkish gays and the military

Military service is mandatory in Turkey, and its policy on homosexuals serving in the military is quite different from the recently repealed US policy of “don’t ask, don’t tell”. Turkey’s armed forces consider gays ineligible to serve. From Istanbul, Matthew Brunwasser reports on Turkey’s policy of “will ask, must tell.”

Sarkozy versus Gypsy

Dec 31st, 2010

Sarkozy versus Gypsy

The Romanian rock band Vama has written a song that takes on some of the common misconceptions about the Roma or Gypsies. And it skewers French President Nicolas Sarkozy’s expulsion of Gypsies from France earlier this year.As Matthew Brunwasser reports, the English-language “Sarkozy vs Gypsy” is stirring up passions in both France and Romania.

Gypsy brass band Karandila Junior

Dec 1st, 2010

Gypsy brass band Karandila Junior

Trumpet player Angel Tichaliev remembers hearing a lot of brass bands back in the old days. But they’re long gone. The older masters started dying; popular tastes changed. In the Balkans, music has been dominated by Roma or Gypsies for centuries. Since the end of communism, the coming of the free market has meant that much traditional Roma music has been squeezed out by more profitable genres.

Turkish immigrants leaving Germany

Nov 23rd, 2010

Turkish immigrants leaving Germany

Germany has one of Europe’s largest immigrant communities, with some 2.5 million Turks. Yet even third-generation immigrants, born and raised in Germany, are still considered foreigners. That’s prompted many Turks to leave Germany for a country they’ve never lived in. Matthew Brunwasser reports from Istanbul.